Sunday, August 5, 2018

Hidden History

When city workers removed the stucco from the side of this building on Main Street, they were surprised to discover writing underneath it. Behind the scaffolding at the top left, you can see the words "After Every Meal," which is apparently part of a circta-1950 advertisement for Wrigley's gum. While it is very disappointing that we are losing the mural below that was painted on this building (it is still visible in this photo), it is neat that the building will have another piece of history showing on it.

Before and After

Here are some photos of an amazing transformation. It was four years in the making, but look at the makeover this house on Austin Avenue got!



Saturday, July 7, 2018

1818 Church Street

This is the new house that was built to replace the historic house at 1818 Church Street, which was destroyed by a fire in 2014.

The Hyer House

The Hyer House at 904 Ash Street changed hands recently and the new owners are doing extensive remodeling. In 2009, the Georgetown Heritage Society restored the door to this house, which was once owned by former Southwestern University President Dr. Robert S. Hyer.


Saturday, December 30, 2017

1111 East Seventh St.

In early November, HARC approved a request to demolish this house, located at 1111 East Seventh St. The owners of the house, which was built around 1915, claimed it would be too expensive to restore it. The house was listed as a "high priority" property on the city's latest Historical Resource Survey because of its unique "I-house" floorplan.

Sunday, October 8, 2017

Main Street

This used to be a cute Victorian cottage on Main Street. Someone is putting on a huge addition that will totally change the exterior of the house. I am amazed someone is able to get away with such a major change to the exterior of a house in a National Register Historic District.

3rd and Rock Streets

Some huge new condominiums or something are going up at the corner of 3rd and Rock streets. Meanwhile, right next door on 3rd Street, the historic Louis P. Imhoff House continues to sit vacant in one of the worst cases of "demolition by neglect" I have seen in Georgetown.